Essay Video Games Bad Children

Ever since Columbine, in which two students went on a deadly rampage at their high school, television, movies, and video games have been a popular target for senseless acts of violence. After the shooting, the media pushed the narrative that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold’s inclinations for violent video games, not to mention metal music and goth subculture, were partly to blame for the horrific incident.

Nearly 15 years later, that hasn’t discouraged teens from playing video games, especially of the violent ilk. Approximately 90% of children in the U.S. play video games, and more than 90% of those games involve mature content that often includes violence. The connection between violent media and aggression has also spawned a body of research that has gone back and forth on the issue.

Worries about how violence in virtual reality might play out in real life have led legislators to propose everything from taxing violent video games to proposing age restrictions on who can buy them. The inconsistent state of the literature was enough to prompt President Obama in 2013 to call for more research into how violent video games may be influencing kids who use them. While there are studies that don’t show a strong influence between violent media and acts of violence, an ever growing body of research does actually support that violent games can make kids act more aggressively in their real-world relationships.

In the latest work to address the question, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, scientists led by Craig Anderson, director of the center for the study of violence at Iowa State University, found hints that violent video games may set kids up to react in more hostile and violent ways.

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Working with 3,034 boys and girls in the third, fourth, seventh, and eighth grades in Singapore, Anderson and his colleagues asked the children three times over a period of two years detailed questions about their video game habits. They were also given standardized questionnaires designed to measure their aggressive behavior and attitudes toward violence.

Overall, the students’ scores on aggressive behavior, as well hostile attitudes and fantasies about violence against others, declined slightly throughout the study. That’s because children tend to act less aggressively as they get older, and learn more mature ways of dealing with conflicts than lashing out.

But a closer look at kids who played more hours of violent video games per week revealed increases in aggressive behavior and violent tendencies, compared to those who played fewer hours a week. When asked if it was okay for a boy to strike a peer if that peer said something negative about him, for example, these kids were more likely to say yes. They also scored higher on measures of hostility, answering that they would to respond with aggressive action when provoked, even accidentally. The more long-term gamers were also more likely to fantasize about hitting someone they didn’t like.

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“What this study does is show that it’s media violence exposure that is teaching children and adolescents to see the world in a more aggressive kind of way,” says Anderson. “It shows very strongly that repeated exposure to violent video games can increase aggression by increasing aggressive thinking.”

Brain imaging studies also hint that exposure to violent gaming may actually temporarily change the brain. In a 2011 study, for example, after a week of daily video gaming, brain scans of a small group of volunteers showed less activity in the regions connected to emotions, attention, and inhibition of impulses compared to participants who played non-violent video games. The effect appeared to be reversible, but the results suggested that extended periods of play could lead to more stable changes in the brain.

Previous studies have suggested that the short-term effects of spiking stress hormones–typical of the fight-or-flight response–can rev up players’ sensitivity to slights or provocations, and that playing violent games can lead to longer-term suppression of empathy. Another recent study purported to find a link between violent video games and racism. Anderson and his team, however, did not see any significant difference in empathy among the players who played more or fewer hours. That confirmed earlier lab-based studies that showed both undergraduates who played violent games and those that played non-violent ones were equally likely to help scientists pick up dropped pens.

MORE:How Playing Violent Video Games May Change the Brain

The evolving literature is why some researchers, including Christopher Ferguson, chair of the psychology department at Stetson University, insist there isn’t strong evidence that exposure to violent video games leads to more aggressive behavior. He notes, for example, that the rise in popularity of video gaming has not been matched by a similar rise in violent crime among adolescents who are most likely to play them. Studies that link violent video games to violent behavior, he says, often fail to account for other factors that can contribute to aggression, such as violence in the home, abuse, and mental illness.

Anderson acknowledges that his own study isn’t perfect, and that it’s not likely to be the last word on this controversial topic. While he used measures of aggressive behavior and violent thinking that are well-established scientific tests, these required the children to report on their own actions and attitudes, which isn’t always as reliable or as consistent as an objective measure.

The fine point of this continued debate, though, is that not all players of violent video games are destined to commit violent crimes. What studies like this highlight is the need for a more nuanced picture of the tipping point between violent games and violence, and a better understanding of how the virtual influences regulate real-life behavior.

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Sample Cause and Effect Essay on Video Games Influence of Children

Video games have been a part of children's life for the past few decades. It all started when Atari came up with its first gaming console, which included a very simple game of tennis. The controller had just one stick and one button to play with. Now, we have many different types of consoles available in the market with very complex games that requires controllers with two or more sticks and a variety of buttons. Video games are almost second nature to the modern children and they are more comfortable playing them. Playing video games can have many different effects (both positive as well as negative) on children. Some of these effects include increasing hand-eye coordination and increasing dexterity mental skills; a decreased interest in other activities such as studies and sports; and a very negative effect of inducing violence.

One of the most positive effects of video games is increasing the dexterity of a child and improving his or her hand-eye coordination. As mentioned earlier, the new video games that are coming out are extremely complex and they involve the movement of many different kinds of sticks and buttons on the controllers. These can be very good for children as they learn to make fast connections between what they see and what their hands and fingers are doing. This allows them to think quickly and improves their reflexes. The newest games are very precision-based and it takes very minute and accurate movements for the children to control the characters. This helps in making the children much more adept at handling and operating real-life machinery and objects.

Another effect that playing videogames have on children is that they tend to get addicted to playing these games and give them foremost priority. This takes the children away from their other responsibilities, such as doing house chores, homework, and other physical activities. Children also end up spending more time playing videogames in front of television screens than playing real and actual sports that involve physical exercise. This in turn can have many health-related problems for the children, as they can get obese if they don't exercise and stay home playing video games. This is perhaps the worst negative effect that videogames can have on children. Parents and educators all over the world are concerned about this phenomenon and they are urging the children to not spend so much time playing video games. Many new video game consoles, such as the new Nintendo WII, have come out with games that require users to actually get up and move.

Many researchers have talked about the effects of viewing violence in the media and how it affects children. Videogames takes this to another level, where the children are actually participating in being violent in the video games. There are many game out there that allow the children to play arm bearing characters who can kill anyone that they want, steal cars, and commit many different kinds of crime. These games can have negative implications on the children as they get immune to the idea of committing crime and end up believing that it is all right. Research is still ongoing on this negative effect and it has not entirely been proven or disproven as of yet.

We find that playing videogames can have various effects on the children, both positive as well as negative. Even though the children can benefit by increasing their dexterity and improving their reflexes, the cost of them losing out on their physical exercise and homework, as well as their becoming prone to violent acts, are way too much. It is important that the parents and the educators take up this problem seriously and enable certain rules and regulations that allow children to divide their time responsibly between playing videogames and completing their studies and other responsibilities.

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